Breakdown by country (Mtoe)

World

67%

Share of BRICS in the total increase in energy consumption since 2000.

Slowdown in energy consumption growth in 2019 (+0.6%), much below its historical trend

Global energy consumption growth slowed down in 2019 (+0.6%) compared to an average 2%/year over the 2000-2018 period, in a context of slower economic growth.
Energy consumption increased at a slower pace than in previous years in China (+3.2%), the world’s largest consumer since 2009, in Russia (+1.8%) and in India (+0.8% only). It declined in almost all OECD countries, including the USA (-1%), the EU (-1.9%), Japan (-1.6%), Canada and South Korea. Australia was the only exception, posting a 6.3% growth (caused by soaring gas consumption from LNG plants) well above the historical average. Consumption remained dynamic in Indonesia and Algeria, continued to increase in Saudi Arabia, Nigeria and South Africa but declined in Latin America (stable in Brazil and slight decrease in Mexico). US sanctions contributed to reduce Venezuela’s and Iran’s consumption.

Global Energy Trends 2020 - Update

New Consolidated Statistics & Estimates integrating COVID 19 impact.

Download the publication

Global Energy & CO2 Data

Access to the most comprehensive and up-to-date database on energy supply, demand, prices and GHG emissions (186 countries).

Free trial

10
Jun

South Korea’s greenhouse gas emissions declined by 7.3% in 2020

South Korea’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions declined by 7.3% in 2020 to 649 MtCO2eq (i.e. -10.9% compared with the 2018 peak of 729 MtCO2eq). GHG emissions have been driven down by South Korea's energy and industrial sectors (-7.8% and -7.1%, respectively). In the power sector, total emissions decreased by 12.4% due to temporary shutdowns of coal-fired power plants resulting in lower coal-fired power generation and due to an increased renewable power generation. Emissions from the transport sector (included in the energy sector) contracted by 4.1%, owing to reduced travel (COVID-19-related restrictions) and the continuous deployment of low-emission vehicles. Residential emissions grew by only 0.3%, while emissions from business and public sectors fell by 9.9%. In the industrial sector (-7.1%), the reduced activity affected the energy-intensive branches such as chemicals (7.6% drop in GHG emissions), steel (-2.5%) and cement (-8.9%).

Due to the drop in emissions, the South Korean emission trading scheme (ETS) is over-supplied, and the authorities set a temporary price floor for allowances, as the price fell below the government's minimum threshold. However, the average price for allowances increased from KRW29,500/tCO2 (US$25.2/tCO2) in 2019 to KRW30,200/tCO2 (US$25.4/tCO2) in 2020.

01
Jun

Australian GHG emissions decreased by 5% in 2020

Australia's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions dipped by 5% in 2020 (-26.1 MtCO2eq) to 499 MtCO2eq, according to the Australian Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources. GHG emissions from the power sector declined by 4.9% but still accounted for a third of total GHG emissions in Australia. In addition, fugitive emissions (10% of total GHG emissions in 2020) declined by 8.8%, partly due to a lower coal production, and emissions from transport (18% of total GHG emissions in 2020) contracted by 12.1%, because of COVID-19 restrictions. In 2020, Australia's GHG emissions stood 20.1% below their 2005 level (the baseline year for the Paris Agreement). The country has committed to reduce its emissions by 26-28% by 2030 from 2005 levels.

01
Jun

Renewables accounted for 11% of Dutch final energy consumption in 2020

The share of renewables in the Dutch gross final energy consumption rose from 8.8% in 2019 to 11.1% in 2020, according to Statistics Netherlands (CBS). Most of the renewable consumption was biomass (6% of final energy consumption), followed by wind (2.5%), solar (1.5%) and others (1%).

10
May

EU energy-related CO2 emissions decreased by 10% in 2020

Energy-related CO2 emissions in the European Union contracted by 10% in 2020, as a result of COVID-19 containment measures that had a significant impact on transport and industrial activities. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion decreased in all countries, with the largest contractions in Greece (-19%), Estonia, Luxembourg (-18% each), Spain (-16%) and Denmark (-15%). They fell by around 9% in Germany (25% of EU's total energy-related CO2 emissions), and by around 11% in Italy (12% of total emissions) and France (11% of total emissions). Emissions cuts were limited in Malta (-1%), Hungary (-1.7%), Ireland and Lithuania (both -2.6%).


More news