Breakdown by country (TWh)

World

72%

Contribution of BRICS to the global increase in power consumption between 2010 and 2018.

Global power consumption accelerated again in 2018 (+3.5%)

Most of the growth in global electricity consumption occurred in Asia (almost 80%, with China accounting for nearly 60%). Electricity demand in China accelerated against steady economic growth and industrial demand. Demand also increased in India, South Korea, Japan and Indonesia.
Electricity consumption in the United States, which dipped by 1% in 2017, recovered in 2018 (+2.2%). Most of this increase came from the residential sector (+6.2%), mainly due to an increased electricity consumption for appliances (representing around half of the electricity consumption) and air-conditioning (nearly 90% of US homes use centralised or house individual air conditioners). Economic growth and industrial demand also raised power consumption in Canada, Brazil and in Russia. It also increased in Africa, especially in Egypt, and in the Middle East, spurred by Iran.
As in 2017, electricity consumption remained stable in Europe in 2018: it declined in France and Germany, stagnated in other large countries (UK, Italy, Spain) and it increased in the Netherlands, Poland and Turkey.

Global Energy Trends, 2019 edition

Based on its 2018 data for G20 countries, Enerdata analyses the trends in the world energy markets.

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26
Mar

Global wind capacity increased by over 60 GW in 2019

According to the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), a total of 60.4 GW of wind capacity was installed worldwide in 2019 (19% more than in 2018), raising the global wind capacity by 10% to more than 650 GW.

25
Mar

India's carbon-free generation capacity rose by 72% over 2014-2020

According to the Indian government, the installed carbon-free capacity in the country increased by 72% between late March 2014 and the end of February 2020, from 81 GW to 139 GW. Around 55% of new installations between 2014 and 2020 (58 GW) were solar power plants (32 GW), followed by wind (17 GW, 29%) and large hydro (5 GW, 8%). In addition, 2.8 GW of other renewable sources (biomass, small-hydropower and waste-to-energy) and 2 GW of nuclear were added. Total investment in the Indian carbon-free energy sector reached US$75bn over the 2014-2020 period, with foreign direct investments accounting for 8% of it (US$6bn).

23
Mar

Global offshore wind capacity rose by 6.1 GW in 2019

According to the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), the global offshore wind power capacity increased by 6.1 GW to 29.5 GW in 2019. Offshore wind installations accelerated compared with 2018, when 4.5 GW were added, and accounted for 10% of the new wind power installations.

19
Mar

Renewables exceeded coal-fired power generation in the Netherlands in 2019

According to Statistics Netherlands (CBS), power generation in the Netherlands rose by 5.7% in 2019 to nearly 121 TWh (+6.5 TWh for net power generation). Most of the increase came from thermal power plants, especially from gas-fired power plants, whose power generation surged by 23% (+13 TWh at 71 TWh) in a context of low gas prices and high carbon prices; meanwhile, coal-fired power generation fell by 34% (-10 TWh at 17.4 TWh). According to CBS, renewable power generation rose by 18.5% (+3.5 TWh at 22.4 TWh) in 2019 (+8.5% for wind, including +14% for onshore wind, and +40% for solar), exceeding coal-fired power generation for the first time.


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