Breakdown by country (MtCO2)

World

3.1%

New growth in CO2 emissions in the US.

Growth in CO2 emissions (+1.9%) builds on past growth

After three years of emissions stagnation up to 2016, linked to weak economic growth, reductions in energy intensity and changes in the fuel mix, energy-related CO2 emissions grew by 2.1% in 2017 and by 1.9% in 2018. Almost all countries are contributing to the rise except Europe and Latin America, with rising emissions in China (+ 3.1%) despite its coal-to-gas switching policy, in India (+4.2%) and in Russia (+3.9%).
CO2 emissions grew by 3.1% in the United States driven by higher energy consumption partially driven by weather conditions
CO2 emissions contracted in the European Union (-2.1%) due to decreasing energy demand (such as in Germany), higher contribution of renewables for electricity generation and weather conditions (mild weather).
In Japan CO2 emissions continued to decline for the five consecutive year thanks to the increasing contribution of solar since 2016 and higher nuclear generation in 2018.

Global Energy Trends, 2019 edition

Based on its 2018 data for G20 countries, Enerdata analyses the trends in the world energy markets.

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25
May

China failed to meet its energy efficiency target for 2019

According to the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), China energy intensity, which measures the amount of energy needed to generate one unit of GDP, decreased by 2.6% in 2019, which was lower than the Chinese government target of 3% cut. The country felt short of its energy efficiency goals in 2019 due to the fast growth in the economic sector of steel, building materials, non-ferrous metals, chemicals, and the services. However, the NDRC also announced that the country carbon intensity (the amount of carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP) decreased by 4.1% against a target of 3.6%. 

15
May

South Korea's ETS emissions dipped by 2% in 2019

Emissions under the South Korean emission trading scheme (ETS) have decreased by 2% in 2019 to 589 MtCO2, representing the first drop since the ETS entered into operations in 2015. Emissions have been driven down by the power sector (-8.6%) to 245 Mt due to temporary shutdowns of coal-fired power plants combined with a shift from coal to LNG. Conversely, emissions from the steel sector grew by 7.1% to 113 Mt fostered by higher production.

07
May

US energy-related CO2 emissions decreased by 2.8% in 2019

According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), US energy-related CO2 emissions decreased by 2.8% in 2019, to 5,130 MtCO2, i.e. 15% below their 2007 peak of 6,003 MtCO2 and offsetting a 2.9% surge in 2018 that was due to increased energy consumption (warmer weather spurred air conditioning demand). In 2019, energy-related emissions fell faster than energy consumption (-0.9%) and the CO2 intensity (CO2 emissions per unit of GDP) improved noticeably, in a context of economic growth (+2.3% of GDP). Most of the decrease in CO2 emissions occurred in the power sector (-8.2% in 2019, i.e. -145 MtCO2), as renewable power generation continued to rise and to reduce coal consumption: CO2 emissions from coal fell by 14.6%, while CO2 emissions from the use of natural gas increased by 3.3% (limited increase in gas-fired power generation).

06
May

GHG emissions under the EU ETS scheme fell by 8.7% in 2019

According to the European Commission, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions covered by the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) declined by 8.7% in 2019. GHG emissions from stationary installations fell by 9% to 1.527 GtCO2eq, despite a growing EU economy (+1.5% of GDP). GHG emissions contracted by 15% in the power sector, in line with the substitution of coal-fired power generation with renewable and gas-fired generation, and they dipped by 2% in industry, including in energy-intensive branches such as iron and steel, cement, refineries and chemicals. Meanwhile, GHG emissions from aviation rose by 1% to to 68.14 GtCO2eq; the aviation sector benefited from 31.3 million free allowances, covering 46% of their emissions, while 54% had to be acquired from auctions or other sectors.


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